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FREE Patterns
Joining the sections is the same as joining rows, but this time I mark the sewing line on both sides. What I’m really concerned about is getting the points matched in the center. After all, you’re watching! Once I have half of the quilt assembled (only three seams! Why am I sweating?) I’m going to...
Here’s a fun way to watch a quilt grow…Jan Magee, The Quilt Life This free digital slideshow personalized with Smilebox
Joining the diamonds into rows is easy. Joining the rows so the points match perfectly is easy, too, if you just take a little extra time. First, determine which row will be on top when you  join it to the section. With a ruler and a pencil, mark the sewing line, ¼” away from the...
Your free pattern this week is from Bettina Havig a quiltmaker, teacher, lecturer, judge, and  quilt historian. She adapted this pattern from a circa 1875 quilt that she purchased at an auction.  To adapt the antique quilt design, she used four blocks instead of six and changed and balanced some of the shapes. However, the...
Confession time. Just in case you thought a quilt mag editor has all the latest and greatest new gadgets in her studio, here’s one of my secrets. Yes, I do have a lovely board that’s 14 inches square, covered with sandpaper, for arranging the patches for a block and carrying them to the machine. But...
This Log Cabin-style selvage quilt from Karen Griska features the classic red center squares representing the cabin’s hearth. The selvages are arranged like bookshelves surrounding the hearth. When the blocks are assembled they create a delightful woven appearance. It’s the ultimate “green” quilt and it’s your FREE pattern of the week. Click here to download...
Log Cabin Library Block by Karen Griska The Log Cabin quilt pattern is one of the most beloved and recognized of quilt designs. However, it may be both older and newer than you might think. While it’s natural to assume that this traditional block originated in the United States during the pioneer days, the origins...
Can’t knit? No problem! Here’s a new way to machine stitch a tote bag and shoulder purse that look hand knitted. Start with chunky yarns, mix in some fluffy mohair or eyelash, then sew it all together using Jennifer Amor’s Knit-Not technique described in the Winter 2006 issue of American Quilter. Click here for the...
Debra Lunn and Michael Mrowka’s quilt Artisan Star (the pattern in the June TQL that inspired Stockholm Star) is stunning. I knew right away I wanted to make the pattern, but I wanted to see how it would look in different fabrics. A line from Robert Kauffman caught my eye. Stockholm reminded me of home...
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